WhyHRShouldConsiderUsingMessageMaps

Why HR Should Consider Using Message Maps

A message map seems uniquely placed to serve the needs of marketing professionals. At its best, it is a tool for achieving message clarity and conciseness. They allow organisations to build a repository of organised, clearly planned responses to the issues and questions of importance to them.

It is, as Alistair Croll explains, essentially a flowchart, that in marketing, serves to show the stages a prospect goes through until they become a buyer, along with the objections they have at each stage of the process and the content needed to overcome those objections.

You can’t target candidates with a single message; and you can’t motivate employees with one either. Humans need to arrive at something gradually, particularly when changing cultural norms, so dividing that process into a series of steps, and then tailoring the messages accordingly, is critical.

“It borrows from the concept of a sales funnel, which should be familiar to anyone in sales or web analytics. It works best for bigger-ticket purchases that involve several decision makers, rather than for small, impulsive buying decisions.”

STEP ONE : IDENTIFY THE STAGES IN A PURCHASE

Message Map - Stages in a Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In an article entitled Building a Message Map, written for SolveforInteresting, Alistair, entrepreneur, author and public speaker who has worked in web performance, big data and cloud computing, shares a detailed plan for how one builds a message map. So it begged the question : Could this potentially be useful outside of Marketing? Could HR for example, find this of value? In this exclusive interview below, Alistair shares his ideas on how HR could benefit from message mapping and the first steps they could take to begin to do so.

AlistairCroll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alistair Croll

Q: You wrote a very useful, detail-driven article on Building a Message Map, which you clarified was a way to ensure messages are clear and targeted. It makes a lot of sense to do this if you are a sales or marketing professional but do you see any benefit in Human Resource folk understanding how to apply this? Why so?

Alistair : The underlying idea behind the message map is that your market isn’t homogenous. Some customers are very early in the buying stages, and just learning about the idea of a product or service (such as smartphones.) Others are making very specific decisions (such as which specific Android model to get.) The messages you send to each group are vastly different.

It’s lazy to treat any market as homogeneous. You can’t target candidates with a single message; and you can’t motivate employees with one either. Humans need to arrive at something gradually, particularly when changing cultural norms, so dividing that process into a series of steps, and then tailoring the messages accordingly, is critical.

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