EmployeeEngagement3

Employee Engagement III: Linking Significance to Transformation

This is the third and final article in the series that focuses on employee engagement and seeks to outline the link between the significance that employees feel, which calls forth a powerful sense of worth, and transformative action.

“The most exciting breakthroughs of the twenty-first century will not occur because of technology, but because of an expanding concept of what it means to be human.“

John Naisbitt

For decades, we have measured and monitored decreasing employee engagement levels. We have applied programmes and processes to address this lack of engagement, yet, engagement levels remain low. There is an emerging paradigm shift away from the industrial age of managing people as machines.

This shift in perspective draws us to look deeper into the soul of an organisation, and the heart of its people for true answers to an engaged organisation.

____________________________________________________________

Featured Course

Certified Mentor Practitioner

____________________________________________________________

The first article in this series, Employee Engagement I: Linking Managers to Workers, outlines the realities surrounding employee engagement and the manager as a key driver. Research conducted by organisations like Gallup, AON Hewitt, Towers-Watson, Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers consistently show more than 70 percent of the workforce is disengaged.

Managers make the initial connection from the company to employee and connect the values, mission and sense of belonging. The employee experience is reliant upon the skill of the manager to convey this information accurately.

Companies spend over $720 million each year on employee engagement, and that’s projected to rise to over $1.5 billion. The Gallup Organisation estimates that there are 22 million actively disengaged employees costing the economy as much as $350 billion dollars per year in lost productivity including absenteeism, illness and other low morale issues.

One of the key elements that drives engagement is a caring manager.

A manager’s ability to build strong relationships with employees creates an environment in which employees are motivated to perform at their highest level. Employees want their managers to care about their personal lives; to take an interest in them as people; to care about how they feel, and, to genuinely support their well-being.

A recent McKinsey Quarterly report confirms the recurring theme the manager plays in employee engagement. Their data reveals three noncash motivators: praise from immediate managers, leadership attention and a chance to lead projects or task forces—as even more effective motivators than the three highest-rated financial incentives: cash bonuses, increased base pay and stock or stock options.

Their research shows how nonfinancial motivators play critical roles in making employees feel that their companies value them, take their well-being seriously and strive to create opportunities for career growth.

Managers make the initial connection from the company to employee and connect the values, mission and sense of belonging. The employee experience is reliant upon the skill of the manager to convey this information accurately.

Upon this foundation, communication is established, and from this place, engagement emerges. People seek meaningful work, a balanced life, genuine appreciation and the opportunity to grow and develop. When these needs are met, a potent resource is unleashed.

Don’t just like this – share this.

Accelerate Aug 2015 IssueAs featured in the August 2015 issue of Accelerate Magazine. This article is locked for further viewing. Please consider subscribing to Accelerate to view this and many more great articles. You can choose to purchase an annual subscription or just a single issue. 





There are no comments

Add yours

x
freshmail.com powered your email marketing